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Cat Seeking Attention Outside a Hotel is Ready to Leave the Outdoors Once and for All


A cat who was seeking attention outside a Hampton Inn, was ready to leave the outdoors once and for all.

persian cat bowtieHampton the catCaitie’s Foster Fam

Hampton the cat has used several of his nine lives braving the streets on his own. The long-haired Persian was never meant to live in the outdoors but somehow ended up without a home.

The scraggly cat meowed at passersby, pleading for help. « He went right up to people for food and pets and clearly just wanted to be saved, » Caitie’s Foster Fam shared. A few Good Samaritans who were in town visiting, knew they had to intervene.

They reached out to social media in hopes of getting the cat the medical attention he needed. Claudia, a foster volunteer of Caitie’s Foster Fam, saw the post and sprang into action.

street cat hamptonHe was found outside a hotel meowing for attentionCaitie’s Foster Fam

« I hopped in my car and drove there in less than 20 minutes. When I first saw Hampton, I was concerned for his health status, » Claudia told Love Meow.

She noticed that his fur was severely matted, and it was pulling on his skin. He was also covered in fleas and dirt, and missing patches of fur.

stray cat hamptonCaitie’s Foster Fam

« It looked like someone had attempted to help him out at some point and then stopped halfway through the process (or he likely ran away from them). He was miserable and his skin was very tender and sensitive. On top of all of this, he was very skinny. »

Claudia was able to scoop him up from the parking lot and put him in a cat carrier for transport.

persian cat hamptonCaitie’s Foster Fam

Hampton (named after the hotel) was very nervous at first, but by the time they got home, he was put at ease by a sense of familiarity as he stepped into a place that he’d longed for — a roof over his head with food and comfort.

« He realized I was here to help, and he really let it sink in that his street life was finally over, especially the moment he realized he has his very own litter box, » Claudia shared with Love Meow.

persian cat hamptonHe settled right into his new abodeCaitie’s Foster Fam

Hampton was over the moon with all the amenities as if he’d been waiting for this moment for a long time. He began to relax and slow-blink at his foster mom as if to show his stamp of approval.

rescued cat hamptonCaitie’s Foster Fam

Hampton was estimated to be 4-5 years old. After a much-needed spa day, he donned a cute lion cut and seemed happy and relieved for the change.

Claudia has been by his side every step of the way to ensure that he is doing well and never lacks an ounce of love.

cat head snugglesCaitie’s Foster Fam

After a couple of weeks of healing, his health is back on the right track, and his personality is beaming through.

sweet cat hamptonCaitie’s Foster Fam

« Hampton has put some weight on. His fur is growing back after getting groomed. He wakes up ready to start his day full of food and naps, » Claudia told Love Meow.

cat hugging couchHampton is loving his new life as an indoor catCaitie’s Foster Fam

« He is adjusting very well to living with my other animals. He loves stringy toys and naps in front of the window. He loves being held. As soon as you pick him up, he just sits perfectly calm and leans in to some head rubs. »

persian cat with bowtieCaitie’s Foster Fam

After those rough days roaming the streets, Hampton is relishing every moment with his human and fur friends in the comfort of a loving home.

then and now cat rescueHampton, then and nowCaitie’s Foster Fam

Share this story with your friends. Follow updates on Hampton and Claudia’s fosters on Instagram @houstonfosterdogmom. Follow Caitie’s Foster Fam on Instagram @caitiesfosterfamrescue.

Related story: Woman Gives a Timid Kitten a Home, He Transforms into the Happiest Snuggliest Cat

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Why Does My Cat Lick My Hair? A Veterinarian Explains


If you share your life with cats, you’ll know that most kitties spend a lot of time grooming themselves, but you may have also noticed your cat licking other objects, animals, or even you!

Not content with licking their human companions’ skin, some cats develop the habit of licking our hair too. Although this licking behavior can seem a little odd, thankfully in the vast majority of cases it is a sign of affection and should be taken as a compliment.

In this article, we will discuss grooming in cats, why they may start licking human hair, how to discourage this habit if necessary, and if there are any health concerns to be aware of.

Terrific Tongues

Cat drinking with tongue

A fascinating study has demonstrated that cats’ tongue papillae are shaped like scoops and have hollow tips.

If your cat starts licking your hair you will notice it is not the most pleasant sensation because cats’ tongues are rough and abrasive (making them feel like sandpaper). It is also likely that your hair (especially if it is long) seems to catch on their tongue.

This is because a cat’s tongue is covered in hundreds of small papillae – which are small backward-facing barbs (spines) made out of keratin. Keratin is the same tough substance that claws and fur are made out of.

These papillae help cats remove loose hairs, dirt, stale oil, and parasites as they groom themselves. A fascinating study has demonstrated that cats’ tongue papillae are shaped like scoops and have hollow tips, these absorb saliva and distribute it onto the hair coat and right down to the skin surface during grooming. Not only does this help cleanse the skin and remove tangles in the fur, but it also helps to control the cat’s temperature.

Also Read: Why Are Cats’ Tongues Rough?

Normal Cat Grooming Behavior

why does my cat lick my hair?

Self-care is very important in the feline world

Self-care is very important in the feline world, some sources estimate that cats spend up to 50% of their waking hours grooming themselves! Many cats also groom other cats in their household – so where does this behavior come from, and can it explain why they may start licking our hair too?

Mother cats lick their kittens immediately after birth, an instinct-driven behavior to remove the smells and tissues that may attract predators. Mom cats continue to lick their kittens over the following weeks, which stimulates them to go to the toilet, keeps them clean, and removes pesky parasites like fleas. By the age of 4 weeks, kittens start to take over the job and begin to groom themselves.

Also Read: The Complete Feeding Guide From Kittens To Seniors

Why Do Cats Lick Each Other?

why does my cat lick me?

Despite cats’ amazing flexibility, the head and neck are the hardest areas for them to groom themselves

Many species of animals partake in social grooming; allogrooming is a specific term to describe two individuals of the same species grooming each other. Allogrooming in cats usually focuses on the head and neck area and is thought to enhance social bonds.

Despite cats’ amazing flexibility, the head and neck are the hardest areas for them to groom themselves, so one theory is that allogrooming is simply helping their buddies to clean the hard-to-reach places!

However, the head and neck area in cats also contains multiple scent glands which secrete pheromones. Licking and rubbing these areas allows cats to spread scents, which help to mark and reaffirm members of their ‘pack’, and identify friendly individuals.

One study into the function of allogrooming in domestic cats showed that higher ranking (more dominant) cats usually groom lower ranking kitties and that it was not uncommon for there to be agonistic (unpleasant) behavior associated with allogrooming. This potentially shows that cats can use grooming as a way of avoiding overtly aggressive behavior and conflict (by displaying their dominance in another way.

Also Read: Why Do Cats Lick You?

So Why Does My Cat Lick My Hair?

why does my cat lick my hair?

From what we have discussed so far it would appear that the most likely reason for your cat to be licking your hair is to display affection and enhance their social bond with you by sharing their scent.

From what we have discussed so far it would appear that the most likely reason for your cat to be licking your hair is to display affection and enhance their social bond with you by sharing their scent.

Cats groom the heads and necks of their preferred associates and friends. It may well be that they enjoy the attention that you give them in response to their hair-licking behavior – especially if you stroke and rub their heads in return.

Some people describe their cat licking their hair just after they have showered. These cats may want to re-establish their scent on their freshly-washed family member, or it could be that they are attracted to the smell of any hair products used.

Most of us will have seen the extreme reaction some cats show to catnip, did you realize that mint is from the same family of plants? If your shampoo or conditioner is mint-scented this may be the reason your cat is trying to lick and rub your hair.

Sometimes cats start to groom themselves more than normal (overgrooming), this can have a variety of causes including:

Signs of overgrooming can include sore skin, patches of broken or missing hairs, and your cat spending more time than normal licking, chewing, biting, and scratching themselves. If your cat is overgrooming itself, they may extend this behavior to grooming you more too, especially if the behavior is caused by stress. Your veterinarian will be able to give you more help and advice in these often-complex cases.

Also Read: What Can You Give A Cat For Pain? 6 Vet-Recommended Options

Should You Let Your Cat Groom Your Hair?

why does my cat lick my hair?

As long as none of the products used on your hair or skin are toxic to cats, there aren’t usually any health concerns from them licking human hair.

As long as none of the products used on your hair or skin are toxic to cats, there aren’t usually any health concerns from them licking human hair.

It is a different matter if they are eating the hair though, as the different length and structure of human hair may lead to large hairballs forming in the cat’s bowel. These hairballs may be passed out in the feces or vomited up, but can lead to intestinal blockages and result in the need for urgent surgery to remove them.

Eating hair could also be a rare form of pica in cats – which is the ingestion of non-food items (e.g. wool, fabric, wood, paper, and cat litter). There are many causes for this, and you should seek help from your veterinarian to find the cause and solution.

Also Read: The 6 Best Cat Foods For Hairball Control

How To Stop Your Cat Licking Your Hair

Cats are super smart, so will soon associate licking your hair with getting a treat – which may make them do it even more!

On the whole, hair-licking is not likely to cause your cat any issues, but many people would prefer not to have cat saliva spread through their hair – no matter how much they love their feline companions! So how do you discourage your cat, whilst still maintaining the special bond they are trying to reinforce?

If you are using a mint-scented hair product then swap it for a different one, you could consider a scent that cats don’t like instead, such as citrus. Try distracting your cat with something else, so that you are still interacting and bonding but in a different way – e.g. playing with toys.

Some people use food as a distraction, but take care not to inadvertently reinforce the unwanted behavior. Cats are super smart, so will soon associate licking your hair with getting a treat – which may make them do it even more!

If these tactics aren’t working then you could try completely ignoring your cat when they lick you – get up and leave the room, and don’t pet or give them any attention until they get the message to stop. As with the treats, getting any extra attention when they lick your hair may only make them do it more.

Give your cat lots of other outlets to use their mouth and tongue – puzzle feeders, toys, and cat grass to chew on are all ways of enriching their environment and redirecting their behavior.

Never punish or shout at your cat for licking your hair – this will not solve the problem and will cause them stress and anxiety, potentially leading to behavioral issues and even aggression.

Also Read: Are Cats Smarter Than Dogs? Scientists Finally Have the Answer

Summary

why does my cat lick my hair?

Some cats extend this behavior to their human companions by licking parts of their bodies, which can include their hair.

Most cats are fastidious groomers, and spend a lot of time keeping their skin and fur meticulously clean. Grooming is also very important socially to cats, and allogrooming (two cats grooming each other) is commonly seen in multi-cat groups as a method of enhancing social bonds and exchanging scents.

Some cats extend this behavior to their human companions by licking parts of their bodies, which can include their hair. It is usually a sign that you are an important person in their life, though in other cases it may just be that they love the scent of your hair products (especially if they are mint based)!

Although there is usually little to worry about as long as the cat isn’t actually eating the hair, many people prefer to gently discourage the habit by changing shampoo, ignoring the behavior, or distracting their cat with toys or treats.

Also Read: How To Give A Cat A Bath

Frequently Asked Questions

Why Does My Cat Lick My Hair After a Shower?

Cats groom, and rub each other’s head and neck areas to enhance bonds and share scents to identify friendly individuals in their social group. After you have washed, it may be that your cat licks and rubs your hair to try and re-establish their scent on you.

Another reason may be that they like the smell of the products you have used. If your shampoo or conditioner contains mint, you may find your cat is licking your hair as the scent is similar to catnip, which many cats love!

Is It OK To Let My Cat Lick My Hair?

If you don’t mind the sensation of your cat licking your hair, then in most cases there is no harm in letting them do it. Ensure that none of the products you use in your hair, or on the nearby skin, are toxic to cats (e.g. pure essential oils, and creams containing painkillers or hormones).

You should stop your cat if they are actually eating your hair though, as this could lead to the formation of hairballs in their bowel, and in the most severe cases a life-threatening intestinal blockage.

Should I Lick My Cat?

You may feel compelled to reciprocate your cat’s sign of affection by licking them back, but this is not recommended. Cats’ coats can harbor bugs and infections such as ringworm, toxoplasmosis, worms, and bacteria which can cause us harm.

Our tongues have a very different structure from cats, and your cat would find you licking them confusing, unpleasant, and stressful. Even between cats, mutual grooming is a complicated business, sometimes ending up in aggressive behavior – so there is a high likelihood you will get scratched or bitten if you try.

So if the urge to lick your cat comes over you, pet them instead – cats usually groom each other around the head and neck, so focus on stroking and rubbing them here for a similar bonding experience.

View Sources

Eckstein, R.A., Hart, B.L. The organization and control of grooming in cats. Applied Animal Behavioral Science 68(2):131-140

Van den Bos, R. The function of allogrooming in domestic cats (Felis silvestris catus); a study in a group of cats living in confinement. J. Ethol. 16, 1-13 (1998)

https://www.pnas.org/doi/10.1073/pnas.1809544115vet.cornell.edu

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Is My Cat Bored? 8 Signs to Watch Out For


Have you ever wondered if cats get bored? We provide them with what they need: food, water, and shelter. They seem to enjoy getting on with things by themselves. And they like to take lots of naps! But yes, cats can suffer from boredom just as we can.

Cats that are kept indoors without access to the outside world are more likely to become bored. There are various signs that can indicate a cat is lacking mental and physical stimulation in their day-to-day life. Read on to find out more about these signs so that you can figure out whether your cat is bored and what to do about it.

1. Excessive Vocalization

If your cat is bored, they might vocalize more than usual.

If your cat is bored, they might vocalize more than usual. Cats do not meow to communicate with each other. Instead, their meows are directed toward people. They vocalize in this way as a greeting, to seek attention, and to ask for food. A bored cat that’s feeling a lack of stimulation might realize that you will go and fuss over them if they meow constantly.

Also Read: 7 Common Cat Vocalizations And What They Mean

Destructive Behavior

is my cat bored?

Without enough activity to release all their energy, they will resort to finding other ways to entertain themselves.

If your cat has begun indulging in destructive behavior, then they are likely suffering from boredom. Without enough activity to release all their energy, they will resort to finding other ways to entertain themselves. Unfortunately, this could take the form of scratching your furniture, carpet, or rugs. They might also delight in climbing up and damaging your curtains.

Also Read: The 5 Best Cat Scratch Deterrents

2. Overgrooming

You might notice your cat grooming more if they aren’t receiving enough mental or physical stimulation.

You might notice your cat grooming more if they aren’t receiving enough mental or physical stimulation. Overgrooming arises from feelings of stress, frustration, and boredom. They will lick, chew and pull at their fur and skin, leading to alopecia (fur loss) and irritation and inflammation of the skin. This sort of compulsive and repetitive behavior should be addressed as soon as possible.

Also Read: 5 Visual Signs Of A Stressed Cat And How To Help

3. Provocative Behavior

Has your cat suddenly started picking fights with or chasing after other cats or dogs in the household?

Has your cat suddenly started picking fights with or chasing after other cats or dogs in the household? If the answer is yes, you likely have a bored cat who needs more interaction and exercise to keep them happy.

Also Read: Are My Cats Playing Or Fighting?

4. Lack Of Interest Or Activity

Cats are usually curious creatures, with an active interest in what is going on around them.

Cats are usually curious creatures, with an active interest in what is going on around them. If your cat is feeling bored, they might lose that spark and be less inclined to engage and interact with others or their surroundings.

Also Read: Lethargy in Cats: Causes, Signs, Symptoms & Treatment

5. Overeating

Just as we can eat and eat and eat when we are bored, your cat may start viewing feeding time as an activity in the absence of other sources of stimulation.

Just as we can eat and eat and eat when we are bored, your cat may start viewing feeding time as an activity in the absence of other sources of stimulation. This can then lead to weight gain and obesity. Being overweight will reduce their activity levels even further so we want to avoid that vicious cycle! It also increases the risk of your cat developing various medical conditions, such as diabetes.

Also Read: Why Is My Cat Not Eating? Loss Of Appetite In Cats

6. Oversleeping

If you’ve noticed your cat seems to be napping more than usual, then they could be doing so out of boredom.

When it comes to sleeping, cats are experts! They can spend 12 to 16 hours a day snoozing. But we expect them to engage in other activities during their waking hours. If you’ve noticed your cat seems to be napping more than usual, then they could be doing so out of boredom. Without other activities or entertainment, they will simply resort to sleeping away the time.

Also Read: Why Do Cats Sleep So Much

7. Peeing Or Pooing Outside The Litter Box

Why is my cat peeing outside of the litter box

If you start to come across inappropriately eliminated waste on your floor or furniture, it’s time to start taking notice and figure out whether your cat could be bored.

When a cat is under-stimulated, they first experience boredom, which can then result in stress. Because of this, they may be inclined to pee or poo outside their litter box. So, if you start to come across inappropriately eliminated waste on your floor or furniture, it’s time to start taking notice and figure out whether your cat could be bored.

Also Read: Is Your Cat Thinking Outside of the Litter Box? Litter Box Acceptance

8. Pacing

A bored cat that is not provided with enough opportunities to play and exercise might turn to pacing relentlessly back and forth.

A bored cat that is not provided with enough opportunities to play and exercise might turn to pacing relentlessly back and forth. They might do so at the same time as meowing excessively to try and get your attention.

Also Read: 10 Reasons Your Cat Won’t Stop Meowing At Night

What Are Some Ways To Prevent Your Cat From Getting Bored?

Give Them Plenty Of Toys

Set aside time for a couple of play sessions with your cat throughout the day.

There are many different types of cat toys available to buy. You might have to figure out what your cat likes best. Always rotate the toys that your cat has access to. Otherwise, they will get bored of them quickly.

Set aside time for a couple of play sessions with your cat throughout the day. These should last around 10 to 15 minutes. Wand toys are great for this purpose and will get your cat up and moving. If you choose to use a laser pointer, make sure to end the session by pointing it at a toy that your cat can catch and ‘kill’. If you don’t do this, it can make your cat feel frustrated.

Also Read: The 5 Best Interactive Cat Toys

Make Them Work For Their Food

Most cats are simply given their food bowls each day, without any need to work for their food.

Most cats are simply given their food bowls each day, without any need to work for their food. For mental stimulation, you can hide some of their food around the house, for example under furniture and rugs. You can also use treat balls that dispense kibble as they are rolled around. Puzzle feeders also make it more challenging for your cat to access food.

Also Read: The 7 Best Automatic Cat Feeders

Give Them Vertical Space

Cats need vertical spaces so that they can climb, jump and explore, as well as plenty of floor space to run around. You can provide them with access to shelves or other tall furniture. A cat tree will offer various levels and platforms.

Offer Window Access

Cats enjoy watching the world go by, even if they aren’t allowed to go outside.

Cats enjoy watching the world go by, even if they aren’t allowed to go outside. You can buy a specially designed window perch. Or, if you already have a cat tree, consider positioning it near a window instead.

Also Read: Is Your Cat Lonely? These 7 Signs Will Help You Find Out

Provide Catnip And/Or Cat Grass

Catnip can be used occasionally to encourage activity and playing behavior. Sprinkle onto toys, scratching posts, and cat trees. Some cats also enjoy cat grass to fulfill their desire to chew.

Also Read: The 5 Best Catnip Products For Cats (Spray & Toys and More Surprises)

Summary

A bored cat will end up displaying undesirable behaviors, including excessive vocalization, overgrooming and inappropriate elimination.

While cats are happy to be left alone, we still need to make sure that their home environment is offering them enough stimulation, mentally and physically. A bored cat will end up displaying undesirable behaviors, including excessive vocalization, overgrooming and inappropriate elimination.

The best way is to prevent boredom from setting in at all. This can be achieved by making some changes in the home so that their senses and instincts are catered for. Finally, it’s important to keep in mind that unwell cats can also show some of the above signs. Speak to your veterinarian if you are concerned your cat has potential health issues.

Also Read: How Do Cats Communicate With Each Other? A Veterinarian Explains

Frequently Asked Questions

Do indoor cats get bored?

Yes, indoor cats can get bored. Having a cat isn’t just about providing them with food, water, and shelter. Cats with access to the outdoors can roam, exercise and hunt as much as they want. Indoor cats do not have this opportunity, so it is up to us to make sure they are stimulated both mentally and physically within the home environment.

Do cats get bored doing nothing all day?

Yes, just as we would if we had nothing to do all day! Cats spend a lot of time sleeping but they need ways to release all that saved-up energy when they are awake. This should be done in a positive way, such as engaging in playtime with interactive toys. If there are no opportunities to do so, they will resort to undesirable behaviors.

How much playtime does a cat need?

This will vary with each cat. Generally, you should initiate a couple of play sessions throughout the day and aim to engage them for around 10 to 15 minutes. If they seem uninterested at any point, don’t force them to continue. You might have to try different toys to see which one captivates your cat most. Leave toys and puzzles around the house so that they can entertain themselves when they aren’t playing with you.

View Sources

Atkinson, T. (2018). Practical Feline Behaviour. Oxfordshire, UK: CAB International.

Radosta, L. (2014). Environmental Enrichment for Cats. Retrieved 19 September 2022, from https://www.cliniciansbrief.com/article/environmental-enrichment-cats.

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Why is Kitty So Mad? It Could Be Redirected Aggression


We recently received a call for help from a very confused cat parent. It seems her cat had suddenly decided to attack everyone at random — the cat parent, the other cats, the dog … Having always been a sweet and loving kitty, this new behavior perplexed the family. After ruling out medical issues with their veterinarian, the kitty’s mom decided to book a behavior session with us at Cat Behavior Alliance.

As we asked her questions about the cat’s behavior during our Zoom meeting, the reason for the “bad” conduct became crystal clear: This was a classic case of redirected aggression. What was actually the true source of kitty’s aggression? New neighbors had moved in, and the sight of their cats outdoors in the yard drove the cat bonkers. Cats are always on guard for predators, and there was a possible predator right next door — one the cat could see but not reach. Unable to attack the true source of frustration and anguish, kitty had turned the aggression toward any being that was close enough to touch.

What is redirected aggression in cats?

Redirected aggression, also called displaced aggression, is one of the most common behavior issues in cats. Simply put, something happened that caused the cat to react in fear, and their natural survival instincts took over. It’s the old “fight or flight” reflex kicking in, the one that keeps cats safe from becoming another predator’s meal in nature.

Unable to reach the actual object of aggression, the cat may decide that fighting with another indoor cat, a dog pal or even humans, is necessary to survive. Take, for example, how we humans sometimes misdirect our anger. The man who had a bad day at the office might come home from work and yell at the kids. It’s not the kids he is really upset with, it’s his boss, but he is unable to properly direct his temper. It isn’t a conscience decision. The anxiety bubbles up and must come out! Displaced aggression in cats works exactly the same way.

So, what is my cat mad about?

What might cause misdirected aggressive behavior in your normally friendly feline? Anything that your cat may perceive as a threat to his territory or his resources may set off the aggression, and his inability to attack the true source may cause misdirection of his survival response to the threat.

A few catalysts to displaced aggression are:

  • Loud noises or yelling in the house
  • Outdoor cats roaming around your cat’s territory
  • Other animals outside, such as squirrels, dogs, rabbits or birds
  • Disagreements between indoor cats
  • Mating season (even if your cat is spayed or neutered)
  • Anything the cat feels is a threat to his world

Need to calm down your cat?

Try one of these natural remedies.

Feliway Classic Starter Kit; $24.99. 

Cat Calm; $23.95

Bach’s Rescue Remedy; $12.99. 

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What’s Mew at Catster? October 2022 Events


October 2022 Pawlidays

All Month Long:

Pet Wellness Month

Animal Safety and Protection Month

Week-long

2-8: Animal Health Week

16-22: Veterinary Technician Week

Day-long:

4: World Pets Day

12: Pet Obesity Awareness Day

16: Global Cat Day

21: Pets for Veterans Day

27: Black Cat Day

29: Cat Day

Learn how to help community cats in your neighborhood. Photo © Lena Bayer/EyeEm/Getty Images

1: TNR Certification Workshop

Community Cats Podcast, in partnership with Neighborhood Cats will host their monthly Trap-Neuter-Return Certification Workshop, which helps people learn how to help lost, abandoned or homeless cats and kittens. The workshop covers best practices for TNR and colony management, including planning and preparation for successful trapping. There will also be time for questions from attendees, which will be answered in real time by the experts from Neighborhood Cats. The workshop takes place at 2 p.m. EST, and registration costs $10, which includes access to the recorded session, handouts and certificate. Learn more about the workshop here.

The Catster team at the 2019 CatCon event.

1-2: CatCon

This is the biggest cat-centric, pop culture event in the world dedicated to all things feline. Part expo, part symposium, CatCon engages, educates and entertains thousands of fans. It also features the latest in groundbreaking products and ideas for cats and their people. Takes place at the Pasadena Convention Center in Pasadena, California. Learn more at catconworldwide.com.

1-2: TICA Cat Show

Austin Cat Fanciers presents its Day of the Dead cat show. Takes place at Frank W. Mayborn Civic and Convention Center in Temple, Texas. Learn more here.

8: CFA Cat Show

Paper Tigers Cat Club presents this show featuring Championship, Premiership, Kittens and Household Pets – and a costume contest! Takes place at Solano County Fairgrounds, Expo Hall in Vallejo, California. Learn more here.

8-9: CFA Cat Show

The Great Lakes Region Fundraiser Show will feature six Allbreed rings, two Specialty rings and eight Household Pet rings. Takes place at Richland County Fairgrounds in Mansfield, Ohio. Learn more here.

8-9: TICA Cat Show

Buckeye Ohio Rollers Cat Club presents A Cornucopia of Cats show. Takes place at Wayne County Fairgrounds in Wooster, Ohio. Learn more here.

8-9: TICA Cat Show

The Evergreen Cat Fanciers present its Paws in the Pumpkin Patch show, featuring 12 show rings. Takes place at Ferndale Events Center in Ferndale, Washington. Learn more here.

15: CFA Cat Show

That’s My Point Cat Fanciers and Lilac Point Fanciers present its a Day at the Zoo cat show, featuring five Allbreed rings, one Specialty ring and six Household Pet rings. Takes place at Tampa Salvation Army Church in Tampa, Florida. Learn more here.

15: CFA Cat Show

Superstition Cat Fanciers presents its Halloween Cats CFA-licensed Allbreed and Household Pet cat show. Takes place at El Zaribah Shrine Auditorium in Phoenix, Arizona. Learn more here.

15-16: CFA Cat Show

Emerald Cat Club presents its Back to the Future Allbreed and Household Pet Cat Show, which will feature Championship, Premiership, Kittens, Veterans and Household Pets. Takes place at Columbia County Fairgrounds in St. Helens, Oregon. Learn more here.

15-16: CFA Cat Show

Hallmark Cat Club presents this show that will feature more than 200 cats. Takes place at Sweden-Clarkson Community Center in Brockport, New York. Learn more here.

15-16: CFA Cat Show

Tiger’s Lair Feline Fanciers and Lucky Tomcats Club present this cat show featuring more than 200 cats. Takes place at Illinois State Fairgrounds in Springfield, Illinois. Learn more here.

15-16: TICA Cat Show

United Cat Club presents this Allbreed and Household Pet show. Takes place at Richmond Raceway in Richmond, Virginia. Learn more here.

21-23: Pet Health Expo

The pet industry’s largest consumer pet health and wellness show for cat and dog lovers features shopping, learning, adopting, networking and exhibiting opportunities. Takes place at the Grand Exhibit Hall in Magic Box LA in Los Angeles, California. Learn more at pethealthexpo.com.

22-23: Feline Forum of Greater New York

This CFA-sponsored show will feature six Allbreed rings and two Specialty rings, as well as a cat and owner costume contest! Takes place at Charles Chrin Community Center in Palmer Township, Pennsylvania. Learn more here.

22-23: TICA Cat Show

Texas Feline Fanatics presents its Halloween Spooktacular show featuring eight Allbreed rings and two Specialty rings. Takes place at the Frank W. Mayborn Civic and Convention Center in Temple, Texas. Learn more here.

28-30: TICA Cat Show

Harmony Cat Club presents its Phantom of the Op-paw-ra show featuring more than 200 cats. Takes place at the Evergreen Lodge and Convention Center in Pigeon Forge, Tennessee. Learn more here.

29: CFA Cat Show

Buffalo Cat Fanciers presents its Spooktacular Saturday cat show, which will feature five Allbreed, one Specialty and six Household Pet rings. Takes place at the Grange Hall & Marketplace at the Erie County Fairgrounds in Hamburg, New York. Learn more here.

29: CFA Cat Show

Cat Fanciers of Hawaii presents its Halloween Cat Show and Costume Contest, which will feature four show rings. Takes place at Neal Blaisdell Center Hawaii Suites in Honolulu. Learn more here.

29: CFA Cat Show

Indy Cat Club presents its 50th Annual CFA Cat Show with five Allbreed and two Specialty rings. Takes place at Hendricks County 4-H Fairgrounds Power Exposition Hall in Danville, Indiana. Learn more here.

29-30: TICA Cat Show

Wild West Cat Fanciers presents its Rocky Mountain Roundup, featuring 14 rings. Takes place at the Hilton Salt Lake City Center Hotel in Salt Lake City, Utah. Learn more here.

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What’s Mew at Catster? October 2022 Events


October 2022 Pawlidays

All Month Long:

Pet Wellness Month

Animal Safety and Protection Month

Week-long

2-8: Animal Health Week

16-22: Veterinary Technician Week

Day-long:

4: World Pets Day

12: Pet Obesity Awareness Day

16: Global Cat Day

21: Pets for Veterans Day

27: Black Cat Day

29: Cat Day

Learn how to help community cats in your neighborhood. Photo © Lena Bayer/EyeEm/Getty Images

1: TNR Certification Workshop

Community Cats Podcast, in partnership with Neighborhood Cats will host their monthly Trap-Neuter-Return Certification Workshop, which helps people learn how to help lost, abandoned or homeless cats and kittens. The workshop covers best practices for TNR and colony management, including planning and preparation for successful trapping. There will also be time for questions from attendees, which will be answered in real time by the experts from Neighborhood Cats. The workshop takes place at 2 p.m. EST, and registration costs $10, which includes access to the recorded session, handouts and certificate. Learn more about the workshop here.

The Catster team at the 2019 CatCon event.

1-2: CatCon

This is the biggest cat-centric, pop culture event in the world dedicated to all things feline. Part expo, part symposium, CatCon engages, educates and entertains thousands of fans. It also features the latest in groundbreaking products and ideas for cats and their people. Takes place at the Pasadena Convention Center in Pasadena, California. Learn more at catconworldwide.com.

1-2: TICA Cat Show

Austin Cat Fanciers presents its Day of the Dead cat show. Takes place at Frank W. Mayborn Civic and Convention Center in Temple, Texas. Learn more here.

8: CFA Cat Show

Paper Tigers Cat Club presents this show featuring Championship, Premiership, Kittens and Household Pets – and a costume contest! Takes place at Solano County Fairgrounds, Expo Hall in Vallejo, California. Learn more here.

8-9: CFA Cat Show

The Great Lakes Region Fundraiser Show will feature six Allbreed rings, two Specialty rings and eight Household Pet rings. Takes place at Richland County Fairgrounds in Mansfield, Ohio. Learn more here.

8-9: TICA Cat Show

Buckeye Ohio Rollers Cat Club presents A Cornucopia of Cats show. Takes place at Wayne County Fairgrounds in Wooster, Ohio. Learn more here.

8-9: TICA Cat Show

The Evergreen Cat Fanciers present its Paws in the Pumpkin Patch show, featuring 12 show rings. Takes place at Ferndale Events Center in Ferndale, Washington. Learn more here.

15: CFA Cat Show

That’s My Point Cat Fanciers and Lilac Point Fanciers present its a Day at the Zoo cat show, featuring five Allbreed rings, one Specialty ring and six Household Pet rings. Takes place at Tampa Salvation Army Church in Tampa, Florida. Learn more here.

15: CFA Cat Show

Superstition Cat Fanciers presents its Halloween Cats CFA-licensed Allbreed and Household Pet cat show. Takes place at El Zaribah Shrine Auditorium in Phoenix, Arizona. Learn more here.

15-16: CFA Cat Show

Emerald Cat Club presents its Back to the Future Allbreed and Household Pet Cat Show, which will feature Championship, Premiership, Kittens, Veterans and Household Pets. Takes place at Columbia County Fairgrounds in St. Helens, Oregon. Learn more here.

15-16: CFA Cat Show

Hallmark Cat Club presents this show that will feature more than 200 cats. Takes place at Sweden-Clarkson Community Center in Brockport, New York. Learn more here.

15-16: CFA Cat Show

Tiger’s Lair Feline Fanciers and Lucky Tomcats Club present this cat show featuring more than 200 cats. Takes place at Illinois State Fairgrounds in Springfield, Illinois. Learn more here.

15-16: TICA Cat Show

United Cat Club presents this Allbreed and Household Pet show. Takes place at Richmond Raceway in Richmond, Virginia. Learn more here.

21-23: Pet Health Expo

The pet industry’s largest consumer pet health and wellness show for cat and dog lovers features shopping, learning, adopting, networking and exhibiting opportunities. Takes place at the Grand Exhibit Hall in Magic Box LA in Los Angeles, California. Learn more at pethealthexpo.com.

22-23: Feline Forum of Greater New York

This CFA-sponsored show will feature six Allbreed rings and two Specialty rings, as well as a cat and owner costume contest! Takes place at Charles Chrin Community Center in Palmer Township, Pennsylvania. Learn more here.

22-23: TICA Cat Show

Texas Feline Fanatics presents its Halloween Spooktacular show featuring eight Allbreed rings and two Specialty rings. Takes place at the Frank W. Mayborn Civic and Convention Center in Temple, Texas. Learn more here.

28-30: TICA Cat Show

Harmony Cat Club presents its Phantom of the Op-paw-ra show featuring more than 200 cats. Takes place at the Evergreen Lodge and Convention Center in Pigeon Forge, Tennessee. Learn more here.

29: CFA Cat Show

Buffalo Cat Fanciers presents its Spooktacular Saturday cat show, which will feature five Allbreed, one Specialty and six Household Pet rings. Takes place at the Grange Hall & Marketplace at the Erie County Fairgrounds in Hamburg, New York. Learn more here.

29: CFA Cat Show

Cat Fanciers of Hawaii presents its Halloween Cat Show and Costume Contest, which will feature four show rings. Takes place at Neal Blaisdell Center Hawaii Suites in Honolulu. Learn more here.

29: CFA Cat Show

Indy Cat Club presents its 50th Annual CFA Cat Show with five Allbreed and two Specialty rings. Takes place at Hendricks County 4-H Fairgrounds Power Exposition Hall in Danville, Indiana. Learn more here.

29-30: TICA Cat Show

Wild West Cat Fanciers presents its Rocky Mountain Roundup, featuring 14 rings. Takes place at the Hilton Salt Lake City Center Hotel in Salt Lake City, Utah. Learn more here.

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Why Do Some Cats Skip Burying Their Poop?


Greetings, my pawsome human minions.

Forrest Wisewhiskers, your cat of comprehension, is here again with a topic that stinks…uncovered cat poop.

Imagine this, if you will. You’re enjoying your day, doing whatever humans like to do, and you catch a whiff wafting from the litter pan that’s strong enough to singe your nose hairs. Now, you know kitty poo stinks, but this is some kind of intense, so you check the pan and find a big steaming pile of uncovered cat poop.

I know, yuck. I myself am a staunch coverer, but some kitties aren’t. For some, it’s just a quirk because they’re comfy in their environment. And for others, they harbor one of several reasons for not burying their poop. Take Kevin TwoToe, for example.

Keven TwoToe Doesn’t Care If You Have To Cover His Poop

Keven TwoToe was the most formidable and roughest cat I ever met. Not only was he the Tom-iest of Tom cats, if you know what I mean, his attitude was just as big as his big furry nuggets. He’d lived a hard life on the streets of a metropolitan sprawl, and his years there had left him with a cloudy eye, missing an ear, and only two toes on his left front paw. He said they went missing in the belly of a guard dog. That same incident had left a strip of his foreleg without fur all the way down to the missing digits. And on that bared skin, I kid you not, Kevin TwoToe wore a mouse skull and crossbones tattoo.

But, for all his grizzle, his tail was the most impressive thing you’d ever seen; a long plume of feathery fur you’d only expect to find on the showiest of the purebreds. And if he ever took you under his wing, you were Kevin TwoToe’s buddy for life. I am proud to say he called me friend, and I often wonder where he is now.

But for all I admired this tough tom, Kevin TwoToe never covered his poo. And he sure laid some stinkies…

He offered the two-toe situation as the reason he didn’t; said the scar tissue where his toes were missing was too sensitive to scratch with. I pointed out he had another fully intact front foot, to which he shrugged and said, “Who’s going to challenge me? Besides, the humans will do it.”

He Makes Valid Points, But Smelly Ones All the Same

His points were valid, but unlike him, I can’t leave my business uncovered. Instinct tells me I must hide away that which bears my scent signature. When living in the wild, cats cover their excrement to keep safe and remain undetected. By burying their business, cats tamp down the odor that reveals just who and what they are, protecting them from predators while not scaring away the skittering prey that serves as dinner.

So, in the house, cats may not cover their litter box deposits because there isn’t any prey roving around to be scared away and no significant bad critters lurking and looking to hurt a cat. But for other kitties, like Kevin TwoToe, covering comes with a cost.

The Reasons Some Cats Don’t Cover Their Poop

Sensitivity Issues Can Stink

Kevin TwoToe listed paw sensitivity as his reason for not burying his poop, which is valid. Some kitty feet are extra sensitive, whether it’s from injury or just by their design. If your little paw prince or princess doesn’t care for their litter because it feels funny on their feet, try a different material. Gone are the days when cat parents were stuck with only stinky, dusty clay litters that couldn’t be scooped. Now, from pine to silica gel, there’s quite a range of litter materials to choose from, and hopefully, you’ll find the one that doesn’t irritate your cat’s feet.

Pain in the paws isn’t the only sensitivity cats can experience with litter. Felines have sensitive noses, and cat litter with added fragrances can prove overwhelming, driving your kitty to get in and out as fast as possible. For cats with allergies, respiratory issues, and plain old picky sniffers, stick with unscented cat litter to encourage burying.

RELATED: How To Make The Right Choice With Cat Litter

 

Medical Issues Can Be a Pain

Like cats who urinate or defecate on the floor, some kitties who don’t cover in the litter pan may be trying to communicate illness or pain. If your cat has always been one who gives a courtesy cover but suddenly stops, maybe it’s time to visit the vet and check that everything is okay. If you see blood or your cat had diarrhea, make an appointment sooner than later.

Senior Cats Don’t Dig Their Pan

Older cats with sore joints and fatigue issues might find climbing into a high-sided litter pan a taxing endeavor, which might lead to going and not covering. If your old man or lady kitty is struggling with getting in the pan, offer them one with low sides or entrances. Purrhaps they thank you with a return to covering their stinky business.

Kittens Who Don’t Know

Kittens sometimes lose their moms early in life. And without a mother to teach a kitten how to cat, orphaned kittens might need a little education regarding litter pan etiquette. To help your kitten learn, swoop in and use your scoop to cover the poo while they’re watching. When your baby picks up the notion and starts covering, give them lots of praise and treats to reinforce the behavior.


Territorial Issues Are a Real Poop

Cats engaged in a power struggle with another feline member of the family might be leaving their poo uncovered as a ‘what’s good?’ to the other cat. Leaving your feces and all the scents mingled within on display for all to see and smell tells another cat in the area, you ain’t scared. Help battling cats find peace with these 5 Ways To Help Your Cats Bond With Each Other.

All About the Size

If you’ve got a big cat, you need a big litter pan. Cats who don’t have a large enough box to accommodate their size may choose to dump and run rather than bury simply because they don’t have enough room to operate.

Dirty Litter Equals Hold Your Breath & Run

You don’t like to go in a filthy bathroom, nor does your cat. But when there’s no other choice, some cats poop and run without covering, so they don’t have to dirty their sweet feet more than necessary. Be sure to scoop the pans once or twice daily to give your cat a cleaner potty experience. Also, dump old litter monthly and start again fresh and clean.

 

Feeling Safe & Secure

As I mentioned, kitties who don’t cover may skip it because they feel safe in the house. They realize there’s no one to hide from or challenge them. So, going and not burying could just be a normal thing your cat does because you’ve given him such a happy home. Way to go, minion; you’re doing a fine job for your feline overlord.

Now, after you cover your Royal Highness’ poop, get them ready to go again, and don’t forget to feed the cat.

Catégories
La vie du chat

Man Finds a Kitten Inside a Bus but Doesn’t Know the Kitten is About to Change His Life


A man found a kitten inside a bus but didn’t know that the kitten was about to change his life.

kitten asking attentionCal the kittenMateo, mape14 via Reddit

Around mid September, Mateo from the South of Spain was on his way to home when he heard what sounded like a kitten as he was passing by an auto shop.

He was able to trace the sound and locate the kitten inside a parked bus nearby. « I managed to find him inside the engine (compartment). I couldn’t see too much, but his meows sounded scared, » Mateo told Love Meow.

Mateo rushed to get some cat food and tried to use it to coax the kitten out, but it was to no avail. The tabby was so frightened by all the noises surrounding him that he refused to leave his hideout.

stray kitten bus engineHe was found inside the engine of a busMateo, mape14 via Reddit

The gentleman left the food by the bus and returned later when things quieted down. He noticed that the food had been partially eaten, and there were adult cats in the area taunting the kitten.

« I put my gloves on and spent about three hours waiting for him to come out for more food I bought. »

stray kittenMateo, mape14 via Reddit

With lots of patience and treats, Mateo managed to get the kitten to safety. He noticed right away that the tabby had badly infected eyes and was covered in battle scars and wounds.

« He was shaking and scare-meowing all the way to my house. When we got home, I put him down in my bathroom with a towel, and gave him food, water, and time to get used to the new environment. »

stray kittenMateo brought the kitten home, fed him and cleaned him upMateo, mape14 via Reddit

The tabby was a bit shaken after the ordeal but relieved to have a quiet space to decompress. He slowly warmed up to the presence of his rescuer and was even brave enough to accept a few pets.

Mateo who goes by mape14 on Reddit, reached out to the Reddit community to seek advice on how to care for the little stray.

stray kitten, real men love catsCal began to warm up to his humanMateo, mape14 via Reddit

« A lot of people gave me amazing advice. I took him to the vet and they gave him a full checkup and told me everything he was going through and how I could help him. »

When they got home from the vet, Mateo placed the kitten back in his comfy nest, and waited for him to feel comfortable enough to approach him.

kitten attention seekerMateo, mape14 via Reddit

« I sat next to him, letting him make the first move in order to gain some trust. When he fell asleep next to me, it was the moment he realized he was safe, » Mateo told Love Meow.

« He was shy at first but craved cuddles and care. I gave him as much attention as I could, and provided him with all that I could think of. »

snuggly ginger kittenMateo, mape14 via Reddit

The tabby started to make good gains, and his confidence rose. His eyes were clearing up and he no longer struggled with fleas.

Each day, Mateo found himself falling harder for the ginger kitten, whom he had named Cal after a Star Wars character.

purrito ginger catMateo, mape14 via Reddit

« He’s a very curious, active and naughty boy who loves exploring around my house and getting into hidden places that I didn’t know I had, » Mateo told Love Meow.

« I installed a little camera in the room to watch him while I’m at work. He sleeps most of the time until I get home. When I open the front door, he starts meowing until I sit down next to him, and he climbs up onto my lap and falls asleep. »

happy kitten, belly rubsMateo, mape14 via Reddit

« Cal has changed my life. The feeling of hearing his meow the moment I step inside my house fills me with joy that I’ve never experienced before. He’s definitely staying with me forever. »

ginger kitten calMateo, mape14 via Reddit

Mateo never expected he would rescue a kitten on his way to home, let alone keeping one. Now, he comes home to his best friend Cal greeting him at the door and following him around the house.

sleeping kittenMateo, mape14 via Reddit

Share this story with your friends.

Related story: Kitten Has Been Wandering Outside, Runs Towards Woman Who Changes Her Life Completely

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Can Cats Get Addicted to Treats, Foods, or Catnip?


maine coon cat having treat

There are a lot of things to remember when it comes to taking care of a cat. Not only should you remember what they can and can’t eat, but you should also keep in mind the potential addictions or obsessions they can develop.

Treats and food can both become dangerous addictions for our favorite felines. On the other hand, despite using catnip as a way to trigger catnip highs in cats, it’s completely safe and non-addictive.

Food, treats, and catnip all carry individual risks and it’s important to consider all of the potential downsides to overusing your cat’s favorite things. This guide contains everything you need to know about addictions to foods and treats, and how to use catnip safely.


Can Cats Become Addicted to Food or Treats?

At some point, all of us have given into our cat’s wide eyes and demanding meows and handed over a treat. Maybe it’s because they haven’t had a treat for a while or it’s just to get some peace. However, cats can become addicted to their treats. The more you give them, the more they’ll crave.

This isn’t just limited to treats. Your cat can be just as prone to developing an addiction to their dry food too. While dry cat food is designed to be more nutritionally balanced than treats, your cat might be more than happy to finish off the entire bag in one sitting if you let them.

cat eating canned food
Image Credit: Veera, Shutterstock

How to Tell if Your Cat Is Obsessed With Food

Your cat might not be able to demand food like your hungry toddler demands cookies, but they use similar tactics to get their way. Most of the time, these methods are effective too. We’ll inevitably get so frustrated by their antics and constant pestering that we’ll give them a treat just to distract them.

Aggressiveness

A lot of toddlers get grouchy when they don’t get their own way and some cats are the same way. If you do manage to ignore their begging for a treat, you might find that your usually mild-mannered kitty grumbles at you a lot more. They might also swat the treat out of your hand or snatch it from your fingers when you do give them one.

Pacing

Walking up and down the corridor or running back and forth between you and the treat cupboard is your cat’s way of getting your attention. While we all love some cat cuddles, sometimes it’s obvious your cat has ulterior motives. This is especially true if their relentless pacing leads you right to the door of their treat cupboard.

Scratching at the Treat Cupboard

Cats aren’t as daft as a lot of people assume. They know exactly where you keep their food even if they can’t get to it. One sign of possible food addiction is if your cat never wanders far from the cupboard you keep the treats in. They’ll scratch or paw at the door in an attempt to convince you to give them a snack.

Some particularly smart felines might even figure out how to open the cupboard themselves if it’s not secured.

Vocalization

Perhaps the most annoying habit our cats develop when they’re after something is being obnoxiously loud. When you’re trying to watch your favorite TV show or get some work done, the incessant, high-pitched meowing is grating.

Unfortunately, giving your cat a treat to convince them to be quiet only encourages the behavior. The more times you give in, the more likely they are to make more noise to demand food.


How to Stop Your Cat’s Addiction to Treats

Treats should only make up about 10% of your cat’s diet. Your cat’s favorite biscuits should never become a major part of their diet due to the lack of nutrients in the recipe and the risk of overfeeding. Fortunately, there are several ways in which you can break your cat’s addiction to treats, it’ll just take some dedication:

cat being fed a cat treat or cat food by hand
Image Credit: Jakub Zak, Shutterstock

Automatic Feeders

Designed to give your cat food at set intervals throughout the day, automatic feeders also have the benefit of teaching your cat not to associate humans with food. It might take a while, but your cat will eventually learn not to expect food from you whenever you enter a room.

Automatic feeders also let you keep cat food out of reach instead of leaving it out in an open bowl during non-feeding hours. This will help your cat learn that they get fed at certain times of the day rather than when they demand it.

Ignore Begging

This is easier said than done, especially when our cat’s big, heartbroken eyes come into play. Ignoring their behavior is an essential part of breaking their addiction to treats though. The more you offer them treats to get them to leave you alone, the more you’re reinforcing the behavior.

If your cat demands food, don’t give in. They should only get a treat to reward good behavior like taking medicine or as a one-off treat as a nice change.

Visit Your Veterinarian

Sometimes, it’s not the treats that are the problem. Your cat might be suffering from an underlying medical condition that means they’re not getting enough nutrients in their diet. Your cat could be suffering from health problems like diabetes, parasites, or thyroid issues.

One of the biggest warning signs for possible health issues is if your cat’s behavior about food changes abruptly. Arrange an appointment with your veterinarian to rule out any possible medical-related issues your cat could have.


Can Cats Become Addicted to Catnip?

A member of the mint family, catnip contains a chemical that’s well known to trigger excitement, sleepiness, drooling, or increased purring in some cats. If your cat is one of the many that reacts to catnip, you might be worried about them developing an addiction to the herb. However, despite making some cats go crazy, catnip is completely non-addictive. Your cat is more likely to become immune to the effects of catnip if it’s used too often.

Some cats also don’t react to catnip at all. Kittens less than six months old and senior cats are the least likely to react to the effects of catnip. There are also a lot of adult cats between these ages that barely react to catnip at all, whether because they’re immune or just not susceptible to the effects.

grey cat enjoying fresh catnip
Image Credit: Anna Hoychuk, Shutterstock

What Are the Risks of Catnip?

Generally, catnip is completely safe for cats, especially when it’s used in moderation. As with most things, however, there are some risks you should keep in mind if you give your cat catnip.

One of the biggest issues is using too much catnip. Overdosing is unlikely to be fatal but it can cause diarrhea, dizziness, lack of coordination, or vomiting. Catnip can also cause aggression in some cats or make aggressive cats last out more against you and other pets.

In these cases, giving your cat less catnip—or none at all if your cat is aggressive—is often enough to get them back to normal.


How to Use Catnip Safely

As non-addictive and non-toxic catnip might be, it’s still important to use it properly. Both to ensure your cat gets the most out of their catnip high and to keep them safe.

Adjust the Dosage

There are a few ways to use catnip. Fresh, dried, as a spray, or stuffed in a toy. The dosage in each case can vary. Fresh catnip, for example, will be a lot stronger than the dried form so you’ll need less to entice a reaction. Concentrated catnip oils will also be a lot more potent than diluted options or the dried leaves in cat toys.

Monitor Reactions

Not all cats react to catnip but it’s still important that you don’t leave them unattended around the herb. Don’t let yourself get too distracted by your cat’s high though, you want to ensure that they’re not getting too excited by the herb. If your cat gets too hyperactive around catnip, it’s might be a sign that the dosage you give them needs adjusting.

Observing how they react to catnip also helps you make sure your cat doesn’t become aggressive when they come into contact with it.

Once a Week

While a catnip high is entertaining for both us and our cat, it only lasts between 5–15 minutes. Since it’s so easy for your cat to get bored with the substance, it’s important to not overuse catnip. For the best results, limit your cat’s interaction with the herb to once a week rather than an everyday treat.


Conclusion

Too much of a good thing can be detrimental to your cat’s health. Overdoing the amount of food and treats you give your cat can result in obesity which increases your cat’s risk of diabetes and other health issues. Catnip can also cause stomach upset if your cat eats too much of it, or your cat might become immune to the effects altogether.

We hope this guide helped you figure out if your cat is addicted to their food, how to fix the problem, and also how to use catnip responsibly.


Featured Image Credit: Nils Jacobi, Shutterstock

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The Top 10 Cutest Cat Breeds in the World


All cats are cute, but some breeds have special features that make them look especially adorable. As with all things, “cute” is in the eye of the beholder. One person might find a certain breed delightful while another thinks it look strange. This is the beauty of the world of cats—there are so many unique breeds that everyone is bound to find one or two (or five or 10) that appeal to them.

Whether you like cats with adorably different ears, short legs, or sweet faces, let’s meet some of the cutest cat breeds around.

#1 American Curl

Breed Overview

American Curl
Origin:

?

Where this breed was first established.


United States

American Curl
Height:

?

The typical adult height among individuals of this breed. Height is measured from the top of the head to the bottom of the front paws.


8″-10″

American Curl
Adult Weight:

?

The typical adult weight range of this cat breed.


5-10 pounds

American Curl
Life Span:

?

The average lifespan of the breed. While life expectancy is fairly consistent across all cat breeds, some breeds tend to live shorter or longer than others.


11-15 years

The American Curl’s unusual curled-back ears lend this breed an absolutely adorable look of delighted surprise. In addition to their enchanting appearance, the American Curl also has an exceptionally sweet and friendly temperament, further lending to their charm. They are even known for cooing at their owners to politely ask for attention.

All American Curl kittens are born with straight ears. The ears begin to curl between 3 and 5 days old. Though American Curl ears vary, show cats should have 90 to 180 degrees of curl. This small breed comes in longhair and shorthair varieties in many different colors and patterns.

#2 Burmilla

Breed Overview

Burmilla
Origin:

?

Where this breed was first established.


United Kingdom

Burmilla
Height:

?

The typical adult height among individuals of this breed. Height is measured from the top of the head to the bottom of the front paws.


8″-10″

Burmilla
Adult Weight:

?

The typical adult weight range of this cat breed.


9-15 pounds

Burmilla
Life Span:

?

The average lifespan of the breed. While life expectancy is fairly consistent across all cat breeds, some breeds tend to live shorter or longer than others.


10-16 years

The pretty Burmilla is simply adorable with its rounded, wedge-shaped head, slightly upturned nose, and extra-sweet expression in its face. Adding to the cute factor is the Burmilla’s “makeup,” dark lines of color around the cat’s nose, lips, and eyes. The breed was created when a Chinchilla-colored Persian cat and a lilac Burmese accidentally mated.

Though the breeding wasn’t planned, the kittens were so gorgeous that a new breed a formed. Burmillas, which may have short hair or long hair, are a silver-white color shaded or tipped with a variety of recognized colors. The breed is outgoing, playful, and loving.

#3 Devon Rex

Breed Overview

Devon Rex
Origin:

?

Where this breed was first established.


United Kingdom

Devon Rex
Height:

?

The typical adult height among individuals of this breed. Height is measured from the top of the head to the bottom of the front paws.


12″-14″

Devon Rex
Adult Weight:

?

The typical adult weight range of this cat breed.


6-9 pounds

Devon Rex
Life Span:

?

The average lifespan of the breed. While life expectancy is fairly consistent across all cat breeds, some breeds tend to live shorter or longer than others.


10-15 years

The tiny, adorable, elf-like Devon Rex is sometimes called the “pixie cat” due to its fine frame and unique facial features—large eyes, short muzzle and prominent cheekbones—as well as its long, skinny neck, and large, low-set ears. The breed was developed in Devonshire, England, in the late 1950s following the birth of a strange-looking kitten with a wavy coat.

The Devon Rex comes in many different colors and patterns and is covered in a soft, fine, rexed coat with a rippled wave effect. The Devon Rex’s personality is as cute as its appearance. It’s silly, fun-loving, and extremely attached to its human family members. 

#4 Minuet

Breed Overview

  • ORIGIN:  United States
  • HEIGHT:  7”-8”
  • ADULT WEIGHT:  5-9 pounds
  • LIFE SPAN:  9-15 years

One look at those short little legs, plus its round head, round eyes, and small, round ears, and it’s clear why the Minuet made the list of cutest cat breeds. Formerly called the Napoleon, the Minuet was developed from breedings between dwarf Munchkin cats and Persians, Himalayans, and Exotic Shorthairs.

It was recognized by The International Cat Association (TICA) in 2016. Only one other dwarf breed is fully recognized by TICA—the Munchkin. The Minuet may have long hair or short hair, and can be any color or pattern. This breed is sweet, gentle, active, and friendly.

#5 Munchkin

Breed Overview

Munchkin
Origin:

?

Where this breed was first established.


United States

Munchkin
Height:

?

The typical adult height among individuals of this breed. Height is measured from the top of the head to the bottom of the front paws.


6″-9″

Munchkin
Adult Weight:

?

The typical adult weight range of this cat breed.


4-9 pounds

Munchkin
Life Span:

?

The average lifespan of the breed. While life expectancy is fairly consistent across all cat breeds, some breeds tend to live shorter or longer than others.


12-15 years

The original short-legged cat breed, the Munchkin breed was developed when a kitten was born in 1983 with chondrodystrophism, which is also called dwarfism. The shortened legs do not cause any mobility or health problems, but they do make for a super cute cat. The Munchkin was the first dwarf cat breed recognized by TICA, which occurred in 2003. Only one other dwarf breed is fully recognized by TICA—the Minuet (which was created from the Munchkin and other breeds).

The Cat Fanciers Association (CFA) does not recognize any dwarf cat breeds. Munchkins come in shorthaired and longhaired varieties, and may be any color. Despite their short legs, Munchkins are active and playful. The breed is also curious, social, and affectionate.

#6 Scottish Fold

Breed Overview

Scottish Fold
Origin:

?

Where this breed was first established.


United Kingdom

Scottish Fold
Height:

?

The typical adult height among individuals of this breed. Height is measured from the top of the head to the bottom of the front paws.


8″- 10″

Scottish Fold
Adult Weight:

?

The typical adult weight range of this cat breed.


6-13 pounds

Scottish Fold
Life Span:

?

The average lifespan of the breed. While life expectancy is fairly consistent across all cat breeds, some breeds tend to live shorter or longer than others.


13-15 years

The Scottish Fold is simply darling—its folded ears and large, round eyes make this breed look like a sweet little owl. They are not only sweet looking, but also sweet in personality. These cats are affectionate, easygoing, laid-back, and gentle. The breed was developed in Scotland from a white cat born with a spontaneous genetic mutation for folded ears.

Not all Scottish Fold kittens have the breed’s trademark folded ears. Some do not have the gene for folded ears. All Scottish Fold kittens are born with straight ears, but around 3 to 4 weeks of age they begin to fold. The breed’s dense, plush, soft coat may be shorthaired or longhaired, and comes in lots of different colors and patterns.

#7 Siamese

Breed Overview

Siamese
Origin:

?

Where this breed was first established.


Thailand

Siamese
Height:

?

The typical adult height among individuals of this breed. Height is measured from the top of the head to the bottom of the front paws.


8″- 10″

Siamese
Adult Weight:

?

The typical adult weight range of this cat breed.


8-15 pounds

Siamese
Life Span:

?

The average lifespan of the breed. While life expectancy is fairly consistent across all cat breeds, some breeds tend to live shorter or longer than others.


15-20 years

The Siamese is exotically adorable, with its large, bat ears, long and straight Roman nose, wedge-shaped head, and amazing blue eyes. When this cat opens its mouth prepare to be charmed even further. Siamese are known for being extremely talkative and will follow you around meowing and yowling to share how it feels.

The breed is also famous for being over-the-top affectionate and interactive, and will climb in your lap, crawl up onto your shoulders, and even wrap its arms around your neck in a one-of-a-kind snuggle hug. Siamese cats come from Siam, which is present-day Thailand, and have a short silky coat in the pointed coloration (a lighter-colored body with “points” of darker color on the head, legs, and tail).

#8 Singapura

Breed Overview

Singapura
Origin:

?

Where this breed was first established.


Singapore

Singapura
Height:

?

The typical adult height among individuals of this breed. Height is measured from the top of the head to the bottom of the front paws.


7″- 8″

Singapura
Adult Weight:

?

The typical adult weight range of this cat breed.


4-9 pounds

Singapura
Life Span:

?

The average lifespan of the breed. While life expectancy is fairly consistent across all cat breeds, some breeds tend to live shorter or longer than others.


12-13 years

The Singapura’s small body paired with large, round eyes and large ears make this breed extra cute. Further adding to the cuteness factor is the unique ticked coat that calls to mind a tiny cougar. The coloration, called sepia agouti, is dark brown ticking on a warm old ivory ground color.

The Singapura also has facial markings, including eyeliner, noseliner and dark lines alongside the nose called “cheetah lines.” The Singapura is a Velcro-cat that loves to cuddle. The breed is outgoing, curious, and loving.

#9 Sphynx

Breed Overview

Sphynx
Origin:

?

Where this breed was first established.


Canada

Sphynx
Height:

?

The typical adult height among individuals of this breed. Height is measured from the top of the head to the bottom of the front paws.


8″- 10″

Sphynx
Adult Weight:

?

The typical adult weight range of this cat breed.


8-16 pounds

Sphynx
Life Span:

?

The average lifespan of the breed. While life expectancy is fairly consistent across all cat breeds, some breeds tend to live shorter or longer than others.


13-14 years

Though some people think the hairless Sphynx looks like an alien, breed lovers know this wrinkled beauty is one of the cutest cats around. Even those who don’t “get” the Sphynx have to admit that this breed is at the very least “so ugly it’s cute.” Sphynx are also super cuddly and oh-so-soft, with skin so warm and supple it’s like stroking a hot water bottle covered in velvet. These lap cats love to cuddle.

Sphynx can be any color or pattern—due to the lack of hair, the breed’s coloration appears on the skin itself. Many Sphynx also have some peach fuzz, which is colored the same as the skin. Though the breed has no hair to brush, it does need regular bathes to control oil buildup on the skin.

#10 Toyger

Breed Overview

Toyger
Origin:

?

Where this breed was first established.


United States

Toyger
Height:

?

The typical adult height among individuals of this breed. Height is measured from the top of the head to the bottom of the front paws.


8″- 10″

Toyger
Adult Weight:

?

The typical adult weight range of this cat breed.


7-15 pounds

Toyger
Life Span:

?

The average lifespan of the breed. While life expectancy is fairly consistent across all cat breeds, some breeds tend to live shorter or longer than others.


12-15 years

What could be cuter than a miniature tiger? Though the Toyger should look just like a wildcat, it is a friendly, loving, and social domestic cat. The vertically aligned tiger-stripe pattern is technically a tabby pattern—called a modified mackerel tabby pattern—that is unique to Toygers.

The black or brown stripes contrast beautifully against the dark orange or reddish coat. The breed was created in the 1980s by a cat breeder who paired the Bengal cat and domestic shorthaired cats in an eventually successful attempt to obtain a modified mackerel tabby pattern reminiscent of a tiger.

Toygers preferably have some glitter, a type of hair that reflects light and makes it look as though the cat has been sprinkled with fairy dust.

Frequently Asked Questions

What breed of cat is the cutest?

Depending on what you find cute, all domestic cat breeds could be considered contenders for “cutest breed.” Some cats have unique features that make them stand out. Some especially cute cat breeds include the American Bobtail, American Curl, Birman cat, British Shorthair, Chartreux, Cymric, Devon Rex, Egyptian Mau, LaPerm, Manx cat, Munchkin, Norwegian Forest Cat, RagaMuffin, Ragdoll cat, Russian Blue, Scottish Fold, Siberian cat, Singapura, Sphynx, Toyger, and Turkish Angora.

What are the most popular cat breeds in the world?

Though cat breed popularity varies by region, some of the most popular cat breeds in the United States include the Abyssinian, Bengal, Birman, Himalayan, Maine Coon, Persian, Ragdoll, Siamese, and Sphynx.